John F. McHugh on the Development of the Trinity

trinity_edited.630w.tnThe late John F. McHugh taught in the Faculty of Theology at the University of Durham. His commentary in the International Critical Commentary series on John’s Gospel (2009) was only released with chs. 1-4 due to his sudden death.

Dr. McHugh, however, has a splendid quote in regard to the doctrine of the Trinity in relation to its development:

Those who listened to Jesus during his life-time did not come already endowed with faith in a Trinitarian Godhead, nor did those who heard the preaching of the Apostles: it was not a matter of teaching people who already believed in a Holy Trinity that one of those divine persons had become a human being. Neither in Judaism nor elsewhere is there any trace of such belief. -A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on John 1-4, 51.

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One thought on “John F. McHugh on the Development of the Trinity

  1. Dustin
    It rwquired the separation of space and time for the Christianity of the Apostles to be transformed into its current form.
    It took
    – perhaps two hunderd years after the crucifiction for the earliest
    ‘strains’ of the Trinity to appear. Trinitarians are just plain wrong in
    asserting that the ‘hymn’ contained in Philippians 2 were an early manifestation.
    Jews in the early centuries would have rebelled violently against the
    nonsense that ‘Christ is YHWH’

    – the conceptual roots of the Trinity were in Europe whereas the roots of our faith were in Palistine.

    It’s strange what time and space can do to something!
    Blessings
    John

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